Healing Hearts

  Healing Hearts are our Companion Horses, they may be  limited or no longer rideable for various reasons, but these horses can still be partners & friends. Forgiving and social by nature, they have faithful, loyal hearts still willing to love unconditionally and without judgment. These amazing creatures often serve as mutual bridges to companionship and healing in therapeutic settings for children, vets, people with disabilities, anxieties, PTSD and so much more. 

These are our fosters or adoptable to the right homes. 

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Pedigree



The Haflinger

  •  The Haflinger, also known as the Avelignese, is a breed of horse developed in Austria and northern Italy (namely Hafling in South Tyrol  region) during the late nineteenth century. Haflinger horses are  relatively small, are always chestnut with flaxen mane and tail, have  distinctive gaits described as energetic but smooth, and are well-muscled yet elegant. The breed traces its ancestry to the Middle Ages;  there are several theories for its origin. Haflingers, developed for  use in mountainous terrain, are known for their hardiness. Their current  conformation and appearance are the result of infusions of bloodlines from Arabian and various European breeds into the original native Tyrolean ponies. The foundation sire,  249 Folie, was born in 1874; by 1904 the first breeders' cooperative  was formed. All Haflingers can trace their lineage back to Folie through  one of seven bloodlines. World Wars I and II, as well as the Great Depression,  had a detrimental effect on the breed, and lower-quality animals were  used at times to save the breed from extinction. During World War II,  breeders focused on horses that were shorter and more draft-like, favored by the military for use as packhorses. The emphasis after the war shifted toward animals of increased refinement and height.  
  •  Today the breed is used in many activities that include draft and pack work, light harness and combined driving, and many under-saddle events, including western-style horse-show classes, trail and endurance riding, dressage, show jumping, vaulting, and therapeutic riding  programs.  They are used extensively as dressage horses for children,  but are tall and sturdy enough to be suitable riding horses for adults. 
  •  In Italy, where horse meat consumption is at the highest among all European Community  members, Haflingers provide a large percentage of national production.  Most are either bred specifically for meat production and slaughtered  between the ages of 10 and 18 months, or as a result of health problems,  or age.[57] The Haflinger also produces the majority of the horse milk consumed in Germany,
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haflinger 

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Pedigree

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Additional Video:


Sharjah's Story...

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Sharjah is always at the lead, first to greet you at the gate
Sharjah is always at the lead, first to greet you at the gate

Racing Quarter

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AQHA Papers in Hand

Racing QH's  are known for sprinting short distances. Its name came from its ability to outdistance other horse breeds in races of a quarter mile or less, and have been clocked at speeds of up to 55 mph, the only animals faster are the  cheetah and the pronghorn antelope.

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Video

Equine Assisted Therapy

 

  • Therapeutic horseback riding uses a therapeutic team,  usually including a certified therapeutic riding instructor, two or more  volunteers, and a horse, to help an individual ride a horse and work  with it on the ground.[5]
  • Hippotherapy involves an occupational therapist, a  physiotherapist, or a speech and language therapist working with a  client and a horse. Different movements of the horse present challenges  to the client to promote different postural responses of the client by  the horse influencing the client rather than the client controlling the  horse.[5]   The word "Hippotherapy" is also used in some contexts to refer to a broader realm of equine therapies.[7][8]
  • Equine-assisted learning (EAL) is described as an  "experiential learning approach that promotes the development of life  skills ... through equine-assisted activities."[9]
  • Equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP) does not necessarily  involve riding, but may include grooming, feeding and ground exercises.  Mental health professionals work with one or more clients and one or  more horses in an experiential manner to help the clients learn about  themselves and others, while processing or discussing the client's  feelings, behaviors, and patterns.[5]  The goal is to help the client in social, emotional, cognitive, or  behavioral ways.  Other terms for equine psychotherapy include  Equine-facilitated psychotherapy (EFP), equine-assisted therapy (EAT), Equine Facilitated Wellness (EFW), Equine Facilitated Counselling (EFC) and Equine Facilitated Mental Health (EFMH).
  • Interactive vaulting involves vaulting activities in a therapeutic milieu.[5]
  • Therapeutic carriage driving  involves controlling a horse while driving from a carriage seat or from  a wheelchair in a carriage modified to accommodate the wheelchair.[5]
  • Equine-Assisted Activities (EAA) incorporates all of the above activities plus horse grooming, and stable management, shows, parades, demonstrations, and the like.[9]  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equine-assisted_therapy


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